Hinote likes Council job that helps turn his childhood town into a thriving city

Published on April 03, 2014 with 1 Comment

Lloyd Hinote didn’t find any surprises when he joined the Milton City Council in 2002.

The Milton native had been involved in so many civic, business and governmental matters over the years that he was already up to speed on many issues facing the council.

“I had frequently gone to meetings and I always worked for the growth and development of our great city,” says Hinote, 75.

Despite nationwide financial problems the city has made great strides in recent years and Hinote is eager to improve roads, expand waterfront activity and encourage more tourism.

“We work together to provide the best possible living conditions for the residents of the City of Milton,” said Hinote.

History helps

He remembers when Munson Highway was a dirt road, Carpenter’s Park was a swamp and Milton High School was thick woods.

“My childhood town has grown into a thriving city,” he said.

He says the city benefits from the decades of history that he, Mayor Guy Thompson and other council members bring to the job.

“We know the needs of the town. We have so far managed to take care of those needs,” said Hinote, a banker and businessman for many years before retiring as executive director of the Pace Area Chamber of Commerce in 2010.

Enjoys his job

Hinote smiles about being both a Creek Indian and a Seminole.

He’s a Creek Indian by birth – his family ties here go back to the 1600s  — and he’s a Seminole by virtue of his bachelor’s degree in management and finance from Florida State University.

Hinote, one of 56 students in the Milton High School Class of 1956, praises the city staff and notes that council members work well together.

He wants to repair more roads more quickly, but grants are hard to find and very restrictive on how they may be spent.

Still, Hinote is happy that Milton has a plan for repairing roadways and that the major overhaul of trouble-prone Sanders Street is underway. It may even be completed ahead of schedule if the weather cooperates.

He’s enthusiastic about plans to expand the Riverwalk, a “long-term project” that could bring new business and more people to the Blackwater River.

Hinote sees a busy future ahead for the city and wants to stay involved.

“This job is a pleasure,” he said.

Lloyd Hinote didn’t find any surprises when he joined the Milton City Council in 2002.

The Milton native had been involved in so many civic, business and governmental matters over the years that he was already up to speed on many issues facing the council.

“I had frequently gone to meetings and I always worked for the growth and development of our great city,” says Hinote, 75.

Despite nationwide financial problems the city has made great strides in recent years and Hinote is eager to improve roads, expand waterfront activity and encourage more tourism.

“We work together to provide the best possible living conditions for the residents of the City of Milton,” said Hinote.

History helps

He remembers when Munson Highway was a dirt road, Carpenter’s Park was a swamp and Milton High School was thick woods.

“My childhood town has grown into a thriving city,” he said.

He says the city benefits from the decades of history that he, Mayor Guy Thompson and other council members bring to the job.

“We know the needs of the town. We have so far managed to take care of those needs,” said Hinote, a banker and businessman for many years before retiring as executive director of the Pace Area Chamber of Commerce in 2010.

Enjoys his job

Hinote smiles about being both a Creek Indian and a Seminole.

He’s a Creek Indian by birth – his family ties here go back to the 1600s  — and he’s a Seminole by virtue of his bachelor’s degree in management and finance from Florida State University.

Hinote, one of 56 students in the Milton High School Class of 1956, praises the city staff and notes that council members work well together.

He wants to repair more roads more quickly, but grants are hard to find and very restrictive on how they may be spent.

Still, Hinote is happy that Milton has a plan for repairing roadways and that the major overhaul of trouble-prone Sanders Street is underway. It may even be completed ahead of schedule if the weather cooperates.

He’s enthusiastic about plans to expand the Riverwalk, a “long-term project” that could bring new business and more people to the Blackwater River.

Hinote sees a busy future ahead for the city and wants to stay involved.

“This job is a pleasure,” he said.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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1 Comment

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  1. Hi Lloyd, Paulin Werner’s daughter, Betsy Dodson. Our church is trying to get a grant to refurbish our Historic Church. I have talked to Randy Jorgenson, and he will help us fill our the Grant Application. in 2018 our church will celebrate being 150 yrs. old. I am also trying to get listed on the National Historic Society. Don’t know why we aren’t already on there. We are the oldest church in Santa Rosa County. I see you have done a lot for the city of Milton, and I hope you can in some way help us. We have an estimate on getting the window frames done, and I am waiting on getting an estimate to get the repointing of the bricks done. They’re are several cracks in the brick, so I’m hoping we can get something done soon, so we don’t have water damage. Can you let me know of any other steps to take on this matter. Thanks so much for any information you can give us.
    Betsy Dodson
    Property Chair
    First Presbyterian Church
    Milton, Fl.
    kbdodson@att.net

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